Firefighters reach scenes faster and better prepared

Active911

(Alberta, Canada) A diesel exhaust fuel (DEF) system is being blamed for a tractor fire north of Gem on Wednesday evening. The owner of the tractor left it running while he went in to the house for lunch but when he came out the tractor was smoking. The owner attempted to put the fire out but there were flammables attached to the tractor that ignited.

Although the tractor was lost, reaching its location with clear communication and a clear map allowed the Gem department to arrive faster. Luchies said the new Active911 system along with the new radio system is beneficial but it was during a Newell 911 meeting on Wednesday that it became apparent. He said he received a text message from Gem’s fire chief stating the new 911 system worked, “One hundred per cent better than the CAMS system had in 10 years.” Luchies added, “That was followed by ‘not even joking.’”

He said firefighters have the app on their phone and the system is being installed in the trucks.

“By the end of next week all of the old computers and CAM systems will be out of our trucks and the new iPads will be in.”

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Inside The Volunteer Fire Departments That Want To Save You From The Next Catastrophic Wildfire

Active911

(Bodega, CA) When I meet 93-year-old Evelyn Cassini, owner of the Casino Bar & Grill — a landmark roadhouse saloon and community touchstone in Bodega, CA, with an ancient 7 Up sign out front — she’s wrapping up a successful game of solitaire on the bartop poker machine. Stuffed raccoons and tangled deer antlers keep watch over pool tables and a scratched up hamburger grill as Cassini unceremoniously motions to an empty barstool and asks what I want to know about the Bodega Volunteer Fire Department next door.

“Everything,” I reply, tugging on a 7 Up.

She should know, given that for a long time the Casino, purchased in 1949 by Cassini and her late husband Art, served as dispatch for the fire department with Cassini fielding emergency calls on the bar phone. “I memorized all the ranchers’ numbers and would call to relay the messages,” she explains. Since her house number and the bar number were the same, her children weren’t allowed to be on the phone any more than three minutes at a time or they’d get a backhand from mom. If there was a major fire, the Casino would become a command center, and Evelyn would communicate with the California Division of Forestry in Guerneville to let them know what was needed. “It was all done by rotary telephone,” she explains, “and it worked.”

Beep beep… Bodega Bay, cliff rescue — vehicle off cliff.”

“That’s us,” Josh says calmly, grabbing his keys and walking toward the door (firefighters never run, I’m told). The waitress, aware of Josh’s credentials, understands the sudden departure. “Do you at least want a cup of coffee to go?,” she offers.

But we’re out the door and into Josh’s charcoal Chevy Silverado in a matter of seconds. A map appears on his phone via an app, Active911, which tracks all 17 volunteers and says whether they’re coming or not. Three have responded to this call: Josh; Ron Albini, the BVFD chief; and Wesley, Ron’s 20-year-old son. Others are listed as “watching,” meaning they’re not going to make it for the first truck but can come to the station to cover a second call if needed.

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Aladtec, First Arriving Announce Integration

Active911

RIVER FALLS, Wis. — Fire and EMS agencies using Aladtec Scheduling and Workforce Management software and First Arriving Digital Dashboards can now save time and provide first responders with vivid, big-screen displays for the station that integrate information from both platforms.

When Chaska Fire — which protects some 30,000 residents of their Minneapolis-St. Paul suburb — gets a call for service, Active 911 takes over the display and shows the call information, address, map with driving directions, map with hydrant locations and a Google Street view of the address.

Chaska has one display installed in the locker bay and another in the dispatch office. Others are being added soon in the main office and training room, said Kirsch.

“It gives our members the information they need at a glance.  It can be updated from any computer, and the automatic population of data from Aladtec and Active 911 reduces staff time for updating a dry erase board or printed schedules,” he said.

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Echo Rural Fire Protection District Keeps on Truckin’

Active911

(Echo, Ore.) — In a city that spans less than 1 square mile, an unassuming fire station sits at the edge of downtown.

Today, the ERFPD is able to respond to emergencies using an app called Active911, which provides key dispatch details right to a first responder’s phone. But Enright, who joined the fire district volunteer crew in the early 1970s with her late husband, Tom, who was fire chief, remembers a different time completely.

“When we joined, they didn’t have a paging system,” Enright said.“We had less fire trucks and old equipment.

Instead, there were three fire phones — including one at a local tavern — and whenever the district got a call, the crew would run down to the station to set off the fire alarm.

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Training Thursday: Get Your Device Code + New Map Icons

active911Training Thursday: Get Your Device Code

We’ve given the app a new look when your device is unregistered, plus added seven new icons to our map data icon collection to help you find resources more easily.

It’s now much easier to pay in app if you’re running an individual-pay subscription. If you’re missing a subscription, or your existing subscription is expiring within 30 days, you will see the “Buy Now” option in the settings menu of the app. It’s a big blue button that will appear at the top of your screen. Super easy.

We realize that in the past, when you’ve added new subscriptions to an agency account, it’s been a hassle for admins to get everyone their device code, but it’s also an essential first step in getting the app up and running.

Now, after your agency members have downloaded the app, they will be walked through an easy and intuitive process for getting their device code and registering their device:

 

West Brow Fire Department Volunteers Use Active911

Active911

According to Coddington, there are about 24 volunteers at West Brow, and this volunteer network is made up of a conglomerate of EMRs, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), firefighters, nurses, paramedics, and police.

Dispatchers communicate with volunteers through an app called Active911. On this app, volunteers receive calls and alert each other as to who is responding. Officers can also send alerts to make sure volunteers are aware of potential dangers such as tornadoes.

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